Fresh marks

As renovations at Clarke Central High School come to a close, problems of grafitti return. SPLOST project manager Joe Dunagan feels a distaste for the vandalism. “Somebody went all the way down the hall with a Magic Marker and did a wave. Cost (the CCSD) $1800 to repaint those walls,” Dunagan said. “That’s disgusting to me.”
By CRYSTAL FOX – Print Staff Writer

As of fall 2016, Clarke Central High School has been almost completely renovated. However, vandalism has already begun to take its toll on the building.

The Clarke Central High School campus is currently under its final phase of construction, Phase IV-B, which will be completed in November.

With the renovation near completion, vandalism — according to students and administration — has become an issue.

“(Vandalism) absolutely drives me crazy. This is $35 million of taxpayer’s money that has gone into building a facility that is state-of-the-art,” CCHS Principal Marie Yuran said.

According to Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax (SPLOST) Project Manager Joe Dunagan, school personnel submit work orders for the repair of vandalized areas to the Clarke County School District.

“Somebody went all the way down the hall with a Magic Marker and did a wave. Cost (the CCSD) $1800 to repaint those walls,” Dunagan said. “That’s disgusting to me.”

Despite this negative perception from adults, students like sophomore Dye’tyer Tabor believe vandalism can be channeled into a positive form of expression, decreasing it in the future.

“I think (administration) can use (vandalism) as an art for kids, to express their feelings,” Tabor said. “I feel like they can make it into an art program.”

More from Crystal Fox

Authors

Related posts

Top